Who we are

The Academy of medical Royal Colleges (the Academy) is the coordinating body for the UK and Ireland’s 24 medical Royal Colleges and Faculties. They ensure patients are safely and properly cared for by setting standards for the way doctors are educated, trained and monitored throughout their careers.

Healthcare is complex and increasingly there are issues where a cross-specialty perspective is needed. It’s the Academy’s job to ensure this work is done effectively and then acted upon by policy makers, regulators and clinicians.

This unique position gives us a leading role in the areas of clinical quality, public health, education and training and doctors’ revalidation.

The 24 medical Royal Colleges and Faculties are members of the Academy, bringing together the views of their individual specialties to collectively influence and shape healthcare across the four nations of the UK.

The Academy was established in 1974 as the Conference of medical Royal Colleges and their Faculties. In 1996 it was renamed the Academy of Medical Royal Colleges.

The Academy is a registered charity in England, Wales, Scotland and Northern Ireland. It is also an independent corporate body limited by guarantee.

What we do

The Academy’s role is essentially one of coordination between its member colleges and faculties to help ensure consistency across all the specialities. While there are many official bodies which have oversight over patient care and the way doctors treat patients, the Academy too plays a crucial role in making sure that these standards are maintained and we all get the healthcare we deserve.

Our activities concentrate primarily on producing policy and recommendations to inform healthcare. Much of this work is delivered by the Academy’s long standing committees[committee page] or through working groups and independent short-life projects.

We do this by focusing on the following key areas:

The work of the Academy is underpinned by effective representation and engagement with all its stakeholders, from the patient in a ward to the Secretary of State for Health. Through these strong relationships we are able, not only to create opportunities to promote our own priorities for healthcare, but also to be well placed to advise and carry out work on behalf others.