Category

UKDEC Reports & Guidance

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Ethical Framework for Donation after Confirmation of Death using Neurological Criteria (DBD)

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The purpose of this document is to provide an ethical framework within which clinicians and others involved in donation and transplantation can make decisions with confidence. This document is intended to complement UKDEC’s 2011 publication, “An Ethical Framework for Controlled Donation after Circulatory Death”. Many of the ethical considerations identified in that document are also present when donation follows confirmation of death using neurological criteria, but some are specific to DBD and are dealt with in this framework.

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Ethical issues in paediatric organ donation: a position paper

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Examining the particular ethical issues which arise in gaining consent for organ donation from children, and how practices in end of life care for children affect decision-making about organ donation. UKDEC proposes a model of decision-making which respects any known wishes or beliefs of the child but which, in the absence of these, provides a framework for making decisions about organ donation.

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Interventions before death to optimise donor organ quality and improve transplant outcomes: Guidance

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Applicable in England, Wales and Northern Ireland

The Departments of Health (DH) in England and Wales and Northern Ireland have issued general guidance on legal issues relevant to organ donation after circulatory death. This guidance is designed to assist clinicians in applying DH guidance on legal issues by providing a more detailed account of the generic balancing process that clinicians may need to follow.

This document is relevant to England, Wales and Northern Ireland only, because of the different legal context in Scotland.